Enrique Tarrio

Enrique Tarrio
Enrique Tarrio.jpg
Tarrio, in a gathering in 2020
Born
Henry Tarrio Jr.[1]

1984/1985 (age 36–37)[2]
Miami, Florida, United States[3]
Occupation
Political partyRepublican[3][6]

Henry "Enrique" Tarrio (born 1984 or 1985[2]) is the chairman of the Proud Boys, a far-right, neo-fascist and male-only political organization that promotes and engages in political violence in the United States and Canada.[7] In 2020, he was a candidate in the Republican primary election for Florida's 27th congressional district, but withdrew.[3][6][8] Tarrio is the Florida state director of the grassroots organization Latinos for Trump.[9][10][11]

Personal life

Henry Tarrio, Jr. was born in 1984 or 1985 and raised in Little Havana, a neighborhood in Miami, Florida.[1][2][12] He identifies as Afro-Cuban.[4][11] He has been married and divorced.[4]

In 2004, when he was 20 years old, Tarrio was convicted of theft. He was sentenced to community service and three years of probation and was ordered to pay restitution.[4] In 2013, Tarrio was sentenced to 30 months (of which he spent 16) in federal prison for rebranding and reselling stolen medical devices.[13][14][15]

Career

After 2004, Tarrio relocated to a small town in North Florida to run a poultry farm. He later returned to Miami.[4] He has also founded a security equipment installation firm and another providing GPS tracking for companies.[4]

Tarrio owns a Miami T-shirt business,[5] known as the 1776 Shop, an online vendor for right-wing merchandise.[16] Slate described the 1776 Shop as a "freewheeling online emporium for far-right merch" that sells a range of Proud Boys gear including shirts stating "Pinochet did nothing wrong".[17]

Proud Boys

Tarrio volunteered at a Miami event for far-right commentator Milo Yiannopoulos in May 2017 where he encountered a member of the Proud Boys who encouraged him to join the group.[4] In August 2017, Tarrio attended the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.[18] His stated reason for his presence was to protest against the removal of Confederate statues.[19]

Tarrio became a fourth-degree member of the Proud Boys, a distinction reserved for those who get into a physical altercation, after punching someone who is believed to be aligned with antifa in the face in June 2018.[20] He assumed the role of chairman for the organization on November 29, 2018, succeeding Jason Lee Van Dyke, who held the position for two days, and Van Dyke's predecessor Gavin McInnes.[21][22]

Tarrio helped organize the End Domestic Terrorism rally held in Portland, Oregon, on August 17, 2019.[23] The event, co-organized by Joe Biggs, was framed as a response to the June 2019 assault on conservative blogger Andy Ngo.[24][25]

Tarrio was arrested by Washington, D.C. police on January 4, 2021 and charged with one misdemeanor count of destruction of property. According to a police spokesperson, this was in connection to the burning of a Black Lives Matter banner stolen from a Washington, D.C. church during a pro-Trump march on December 12, 2020 that drew around 200 Proud Boys.[26][27] Tarrio was also charged with two felony counts of possession of a high capacity feeding device after two high-capacity firearms magazines were found on Tarrio when he was arrested.[28][29] A statement released by African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was one of two historically black churches targeted during the December 12 D.C. protest, also revealed that the church had filed a lawsuit against both Tarrio and Proud Boys organization.[30][31] After his release on January 5, 2021, Tarrio was banned from entering Washington, DC, except for trial or meeting with his lawyers. [32][33][34][35]

Political views

In regard to his views on extremist groups and ideologies, Tarrio has been quoted as saying, "I denounce white supremacy. I denounce anti-Semitism. I denounce racism. I denounce fascism. I denounce communism and any other -ism that is prejudiced towards people because of their race, religion, culture, tone of skin."[36] In regard to his own ethnicity, he has said, "I'm pretty brown, I'm Cuban. There's nothing white supremacist about me."[18]

After Tarrio confronted and shouted expletives at House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in Coral Gables in late 2018, the chairman of the Miami-Dade Republican Party apologized and U.S. Senator Marco Rubio compared the disruptors to the "repudiation mobs Castro has long ago used in Cuba."[1]

In 2018, Twitter removed Tarrio's account, amongst others related to the Proud Boys, citing how platform policy prohibited accounts related to violent extremist groups. The following year, another account created by Tarrio to evade the suspension was detected and removed from the platform by Twitter.[37]

Tarrio is a close friend of Roger Stone.[10] After Stone was arrested in January 2019, Tarrio appeared outside the courtroom in a shirt emblazoned with the message "Roger Stone did nothing wrong".[38]

Tarrio began a run for Congress for Florida's 27th district in 2020, but withdrew before the Republican Party primary. In his campaign's responses to a Ballotpedia survey done in 2019, Tarrio listed criminal justice reform, protection of the Second Amendment, countering domestic terrorism, ending the war on drugs, free speech on digital platforms, and immigration reform among some of his priorities.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c Smiley, David; Gamez Torrez, Nora; Hall, Kevin G. (October 2, 2020). "Proud Boys try to assimilate into Florida GOP as Trump denies knowing extremist group". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on October 4, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c Steinhauer, Jennifer; Benner, Katie; Schmitt, Eric; Cooper, Helene (January 4, 2021). "Leader of Proud Boys, a Far-Right Group, Is Arrested as D.C. Braces for Protests". The New York Times. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d "Enrique Tarrio". Ballotpedia. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g O'Connor, Meg (December 10, 2018). "Hate Goes Mainstream With the Miami Proud Boys". Miami New Times. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  5. ^ a b MacFarquhar, Neil; Feuer, Alan; Baker, Mike; Frenkel, Sheera (September 30, 2020). "Far-Right Group That Trades in Political Violence Gets a Boost". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  6. ^ a b "FEC Form 2 for Report FEC-1361386". docquery.fec.gov. Archived from the original on October 7, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  7. ^ a b The Proud Boys are far-right: Fascist: Men Only: Extremism and racism:
    • "Proud Boys". Southern Poverty Law Center. Archived from the original on October 16, 2018. Retrieved October 16, 2018.
    • Lowry, Rich (October 19, 2018). "The Poisonous Allure of Right-Wing Violence". National Review. Archived from the original on October 22, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018. McInnes is open about his glorification of violence. In a speech, he described a clash with Antifa outside a talk he gave at NYU last year: 'My guys are left to fight. And here's the crucial part: We do. And we beat the crap out of them.' He related what a Proud Boy who got arrested told him afterward: 'It was really, really fun.' According to McInnes: 'Violence doesn't feel good. Justified violence feels great. And fighting solves everything.'
  8. ^ Iannelli, Jerry (February 5, 2020). "Proud Boys Leader Has Raised Basically No Money for Miami Congressional Run". Miami New Times. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  9. ^ Sidner, Sara (October 1, 2020). "Leader of Proud Boys also leads grassroots group Latinos for Trump". CNN. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020.
  10. ^ a b Karni, Annie (October 2, 2020). "The Florida director of a pro-Trump Latino group is the chairman of the Proud Boys". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 3, 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Ceballos, Joshua (September 30, 2020). "Proud Boys Respond to Trump's Debate Night Comments". Archived from the original on October 5, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  12. ^ Lipscomb, Jessica (November 1, 2019). "Local Douchebag Announces 2020 Congressional Run". Miami New Times. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  13. ^ Boryga, Andrew. "South Florida Proud Boys leader reacts with pride to President Trump's debate-night call to 'stand by'". Sun-Sentinel. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  14. ^ Owen, Tess (November 4, 2019). "Proud Boys Leader and Roger Stone Fanboy Is Running for Congress". vice.com. Archived from the original on October 1, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  15. ^ Sollenberger, Roger (December 15, 2020). "How did a Proud Boys leader with a felony record get into the White House?". Salon. Retrieved December 24, 2020.
  16. ^ Weill, Kelly (January 29, 2019). "The Proud Boys Are Now Roger Stone's Personal Army". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on January 29, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  17. ^ Glaser, April (February 7, 2019). "It Just Got a Lot Harder for the Proud Boys to Sell Their Merch Online". Slate. Archived from the original on February 8, 2019. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  18. ^ a b Orecchio-Egresitz, Haven (September 30, 2020). "The Proud Boys chairman says members of the organization are running for office — and you might not know if you're voting for one". Insider. Archived from the original on October 17, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  19. ^ Viteri, Amy (August 18, 2017). "White nationalist who attended rally in Charlottesville explains his beliefs". WPLG. Archived from the original on October 3, 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  20. ^ Coaston, Jane (October 15, 2018). "The Proud Boys, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on October 3, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020. became a fourth-degree Proud Boy after punching a purported member of antifa in the face in June 2018.
  21. ^ Merlan, Anna (November 29, 2018). "The Proud Boys' Hilarious Slow-Motion Disintegration Continues". Splinter. Archived from the original on November 30, 2018. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  22. ^ Farrell, Paul (November 29, 2018). "Enrique Tarrio: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". Heavy.com. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  23. ^ Wesley, Lashay (August 11, 2019). "Rival demonstrations planned on August 17 in Downtown Portland". KATU (TV). Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  24. ^ Wilson, Jason (August 18, 2019). "US far-right group vows to march monthly following Portland rally". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved October 15, 2020.
  25. ^ Flaccus, Gillian (August 16, 2019). "Arrests precede major demonstrations in Portland, Oregon". AP News. Archived from the original on October 6, 2020. Retrieved October 15, 2020.
  26. ^ Hermann, Peter (December 18, 2020). "Proud Boys leader says he burned Black Lives Matter banner stolen from church during demonstrations in D.C." The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  27. ^ Landay, Jonathan; Gardner, Timothy; Lawder, David (December 13, 2020). "Pro-Trump protests decry president's election loss, opposing groups clash in Washington". CNBC. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  28. ^ Hermann, Peter; Weil, Martin (January 4, 2021). "Proud Boys leader arrested in the burning of Black Lives Matter banner, D.C. police say". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  29. ^ Lambert, Evan (January 4, 2021). "Proud Boys' leader Enrique Tarrio arrested in DC, police say". Fox 5 DC. Retrieved January 5, 2021.
  30. ^ "Protesters Ripped, Set Fire to BLM Signs at DC Churches, Organizers Respond". NBC 5 Washington. January 4, 2020. Retrieved January 5, 2020.
  31. ^ "DC church suing Proud Boys over Black Lives Matter sign vandalism". Fox 5 DC. January 4, 2020. Retrieved January 5, 2020.
  32. ^ "Judge bans Proud Boys leader from Washington after arrest". AP NEWS. January 5, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  33. ^ "Proud Boys leader released from jail, ordered to stay away from DC". wusa9.com. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  34. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer; Benner, Katie; Schmitt, Eric; Cooper, Helene (January 5, 2021). "Leader of Proud Boys, a Far-Right Group, Is Arrested as D.C. Braces for Protests". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  35. ^ "Proud Boys leader released from jail but ordered to leave DC and stay away". WTOP. January 5, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  36. ^ Burgos, Marisela (September 30, 2020). "Proud Boys chairman tells 7News group is misunderstood; group labeled 'dangerous'". WSVN. Archived from the original on October 4, 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020.
  37. ^ Lipscomb, Jessica (March 13, 2019). "Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio Removed From Twitter for 'Evading Suspension'". Miami New Times. Archived from the original on October 3, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.
  38. ^ O'Connor, Jerry Iannelli, Meg (February 21, 2019). "Roger Stone Admits Extensive Ties to Extremist Group Florida Proud Boys in Court". Miami New Times. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved October 2, 2020.

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