George Floyd

George Floyd
George Floyd.png
Floyd in 2016
Born
George Perry Floyd Jr.

(1973-10-14)October 14, 1973[1]
Died (aged 46)
Other namesBig Floyd, Big George, Perry, G
EducationSouth Florida Community College
OccupationTruck driver, security guard
Children5

George Perry Floyd Jr. (October 14, 1973 – May 25, 2020) was an African-American man who died during a police arrest in Minneapolis. Protests over police treatment of Floyd and other African Americans quickly spread across the United States and internationally.

Biography

Floyd was born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, and raised in Cuney Homes[2] of the Third Ward[3] of Houston, Texas.[4][5] Friends and family called him Perry[6] and characterized him as a "gentle giant."[7] Floyd was reportedly between 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) to 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) tall.[8][9]

He played on the basketball and football teams at Yates High School,[5][2] and attended South Florida Community College for two years, playing on its basketball team.[10][11] Floyd returned to Houston where he became an automotive customizer.[12] He also performed as a rapper "Big Floyd" in the hip-hop group Screwed Up Click.[13][14][15] Following a string of arrests for theft and drug possession,[2] Floyd was charged in 2007 for armed robbery in a home invasion; he took a plea deal in 2009 for five years in prison.[16][17] After his release, he became involved with a local ministry, Resurrection Houston.[2]

In 2014, he moved to Minnesota,[18] where he took jobs driving a truck and providing security at a restaurant.[3] In 2017 he filmed an anti-gun violence video.[2][7] In 2020 he lost the security job due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[19]

While with Screwed Up Click, Floyd met attractive women and had children with a few of them.[20] He was a good father to his five children,[20][21][22] including two daughters in Houston, ages 6 and 22, and an adult son in Bryan, Texas.[23][24]

Death

On May 25, 2020, Floyd, suspected of passing a counterfeit $20 bill,[25] died in Minneapolis, Minnesota after Derek Chauvin, a white police officer, pressed his knee to Floyd's neck for almost nine minutes. Floyd was handcuffed face down in the street,[26][27][28] while two other officers further restrained Floyd and a fourth prevented onlookers from intervening.[29]:6:24[30][31] During the final three minutes Floyd was motionless and had no pulse,[26][28] but officers made no attempt to revive him[32]:6:46 and Chauvin kept his knee on Floyd's neck even as arriving emergency medical technicians attempted to treat him.[32]:7:21 The official autopsy found Floyd died of cardiac arrest caused by being restrained.[8][33] Floyd was positive for COVID-19 at the time of his death; he was under the influence of fentanyl and had methamphetamine in his system.[8][34] A second autopsy, commissioned by Floyd's family, found that the "evidence is consistent with mechanical asphyxia as the cause" of death, with neck compression restricting blood flow to the brain, and back compression restricting breathing.[35]

Protests

After Floyd's death, demonstrations and protests against use of excessive force by police officers and lack of police accountability were held globally.[36][37][38] Additional protests developed in over 400 cities throughout all 50 American states and internationally. Floyd's death was likened to the 2014 death of Eric Garner, a black man killed by police in Staten Island, New York who similarly repeated "I can't breathe" while placed under a chokehold.[4][39]

Memorials and legacy

On June 4 a memorial service was held in Minneapolis with the Rev. Al Sharpton delivering the eulogy.[6][6]

North Central University in Minneapolis announced a memorial scholarship in Floyd's name and challenged other colleges and universities to follow suit.[40][41] University president Scott Hagen announced that as of June 4 the scholarship fund had received US$53,000 in donations.[41] Alabama State announced a scholarship honoring Floyd and Greg Gunn in response hours later, challenging other historically black colleges and universities to follow suit.[42]

References

  1. ^ "Mr. George Floyd Jr. - View Obituary & Service Information". Mr. George Floyd Jr. Obituary.
  2. ^ a b c d e "An athlete, friend and father - who was George Floyd?". BBC News. May 31, 2020. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  3. ^ a b Richmond, Todd (May 28, 2020). "Who was George Floyd? Unemployed due to coronavirus, he'd moved to Minneapolis for a fresh start". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 3, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Murphy, Esme (May 26, 2020). "'I Can't Breathe!': Video Of Fatal Arrest Shows Minneapolis Officer Kneeling On George Floyd's Neck For Several Minutes". KSTP-TV. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020. While lying facedown on the road, Floyd repeatedly groans and says he can't breathe.
  5. ^ a b Gill, Julian (May 27, 2020). "In Houston, friends and family mourn 'gentle giant' George Floyd amid calls for murder charges for cops". Houston Chronicle. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c Wallace, Danielle (June 4, 2020). "Hundreds, including Al Sharpton, Eric Garner's mom, mourn at George Floyd memorial in Minneapolis". Fox News. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Who was George Floyd? The 'gentle giant' who was trying to turn his life around". Sky News. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c "Hennepin County ME Autopsy Report" (PDF). Hennepin County. June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  9. ^ Pereira, Ivan (June 2, 2020). "Nationwide protests return focus to why George Floyd was initially detained". ABC News. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  10. ^ Ebrahimji, Alisha (May 29, 2020). "This is how loved ones want us to remember George Floyd". CNN. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  11. ^ Holton, Jennifer (May 29, 2020). "'A good guy:' College classmate, coach remember George Floyd". WTVT. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  12. ^ Lance Scott Walker (2019). Houston Rap Tapes: An Oral History of Bayou City Hip-Hop. University of Texas Press. p. 83.
  13. ^ Julian, Gill (May 27, 2020). "Before dying in Minneapolis police custody, George Floyd grew up in Houston's Third Ward". Houston Chronicle. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  14. ^ Burney, Lawrence (May 29, 2020). "The Rap Report: To George Floyd a.k.a. Big Floyd of the legendary Screwed Up Click". FADER. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  15. ^ Holmes, Charles (July 2, 2020). "'He Shook the World': George Floyd's Legendary Houston Legacy". Rolling Stone. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  16. ^ Toone, Stephanie (June 3, 2020). "George Floyd, man killed in Minneapolis police encounter, had started new life in Minnesota". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  17. ^ Walters, Joanna (May 29, 2020). "An athlete, a father, a 'beautiful spirit': George Floyd in his friends' words". The Guardian. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  18. ^ Toone, Stephanie (May 29, 2020). "Floyd's brother tearfully asked for justice and peace following the 46-year-old bouncer's death Thursday". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  19. ^ Richmond, Todd (May 28, 2020). "George Floyd had started a new life in Minnesota before he was killed by police". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 28, 2020.
  20. ^ a b "George Floyd was killed on May 25th". The Economist. June 4, 2020. Retrieved June 5, 2020. Best of all, he met attractive women, by several of whom he had children. He was a good father while he was around.
  21. ^ Evelyn, Kenya (June 3, 2020). "'I miss him': George Floyd's daughter speaks out for first time". The Guardian. Retrieved June 5, 2020. She added Floyd was a good father who wanted his daughter 'to have the best'.
  22. ^ "George Floyd Memorial Service In Minneapolis". NBC News. June 4, 2020. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  23. ^ Ellis, Nicquel Terry; Davis, Tyler J. (May 28, 2020). "George Floyd remembered as 'gentle giant' as family calls his death 'murder'". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  24. ^ "George Floyd's son joins Texas protesters in peaceful demonstration," KTRK-TV, (a local ABC News affiliate), June 1, 2020.
  25. ^ Furber, Matt; Burch, Audra D. S.; Robles, Frances (May 29, 2020). "George Floyd Worked With Officer Charged in His Death". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on May 30, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  26. ^ a b Complaint – State of Minnesota v. Derek Michael Chauvin, Minnesota District Court, Fourth Judicial District, File No. 27-CR-20-12646. May 29, 2020.
  27. ^ Brooks, Jennifer (May 28, 2020). "George Floyd and the city that killed him". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 29, 2020. Down the road, people were marching and mourning Floyd, whose irreplaceable life ended after an arrest face-down on the asphalt of E. 38th Street.
  28. ^ a b Silverman, Hollie (May 29, 2020). "Floyd was "non-responsive" for nearly 3 minutes before officer took knee off his neck, complaint says". CNN. Archived from the original on May 30, 2020. Retrieved May 29, 2020. Chauvin had his knee on Floyd's neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in total, and 2 minutes and 53 seconds after Floyd was unresponsive, the complaint said.
  29. ^ Cite error: The named reference WPtimeline was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  30. ^ Mannix, Andy (May 26, 2020). "What we know about Derek Chauvin and Tou Thao, two of the officers caught on tape in the death of George Floyd". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  31. ^ "Officer Charged With George Floyd's Death as Protests Flare". The New York Times. Associated Press. May 29, 2020.
  32. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference NYTtimeline was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  33. ^ "George Floyd death was homicide, says updated medical examiner's report". www.abc.net.au. June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  34. ^ "Hennepin County Press Release on George Floyd's Death" (PDF). Hennepin County. June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  35. ^ Furber, Matt; Burch, Audra D. S.; Robles, Frances (May 29, 2020). "George Floyd Worked With Officer Charged in His Death". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on May 30, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  36. ^ AP (May 28, 2020). "Violent protests rock Minneapolis for 2nd straight night over in-custody death". KABC-TV. Retrieved May 28, 2020.
  37. ^ Jimenez, Omar; Chavez, Nicole; Hanna, Jason (May 28, 2020). "As heated protests over George Floyd's death continue, Minnesota governor warns of 'extremely dangerous situation'". CNN. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 28, 2020.
  38. ^ DeMarche, Edmund (May 28, 2020). "Deadly shooting near George Floyd protest as looting, arson grip Minneapolis". Fox News Channel. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved May 28, 2020. Some protesters skirmished with officers, who fired rubber bullets and tear gas in a repeat of Tuesday night's confrontation
  39. ^ "Mayor makes emotional call for peace after violent protests: "I believe in Minneapolis"". CBS News. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020. Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  40. ^ Nietzel, Michael T. "A University President Challenges Every College In America To Fund A George Floyd Memorial Scholarship". Forbes. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  41. ^ a b Torres, Ella (June 4, 2020). "George Floyd memorial updates: Floyd's brother says 'he touched so many people's hearts'". ABC News. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  42. ^ "ASU Establishes George Floyd/Greg Gunn Memorial Scholarship | Alabama State University". www.alasu.edu. Retrieved June 5, 2020.

External links

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